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Quality system is the foundation of delivering a quality welded product or service.

February 03,2021    104     admin

The workshop is fully equipped with today's latest equipment and techniques to meet our customer's specifications. An appropriate welding quality system is the foundation of delivering a quality welded product or service.

Specs & Capabilities:

Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW): Also known as stick welding. Electric current is used to strike an arc between the base material and consumable electrode rod, which is made of steel and is covered with a flux that protects the weld area from oxidation and contamination by producing CO 2 gas during the welding process. The process is generally limited to welding ferrous materials.

The workshop is fully equipped with today's latest equipment and techniques to meet our customer's specifications. An appropriate welding quality system is the foundation of delivering a quality welded product or service.

Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW): Also known as metal inert gas or MIG welding, is a semi-automatic or automatic process that uses a continuous wire feed as an electrode and an inert or semi-inert gas mixture to protect the weld from contamination. Since the electrode is continuous, welding speeds are greater for GMAW than for SMAW.

The equipment required to perform the GMAW process is more complex and expensive than that required for SMAW, and requires a more complex setup procedure. GMAW is well suited to production welding.

The process can be applied to a wide variety of metals, both ferrous and non-ferrous Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW): Related to GMAW, it uses similar equipment but uses wire consisting of a steel electrode surrounding a powder fill material. This cored wire is more expensive than the standard solid wire and can generate slag, but it permits even higher welding speed and greater metal penetration Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW): Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding is a manual welding process that uses a tungsten electrode, an inert or semi-inert gas mixture, and a separate filler material. Especially useful for welding thin materials, this method is characterized by a stable arc and high quality welds, but it requires significant operator skill and can only be accomplished at relatively low speeds. GTAW can be used on nearly all weldable metals, though it is most often applied to stainless steel and light metals.

Spot Welding: A resistance welding method used to join overlapping metal sheets of up to 3 mm thick. Two electrodes are simultaneously used to clamp the metal sheets together and to pass current through the sheets. The advantages of the method include efficient energy use, limited work piece deformation, and no required filler materials. Weld strength is significantly lower than with other welding methods, making the process suitable for only certain applications on ferrous metals.